Big Data: Have You Carved Your Dugout Canoe?

Technology pioneer George Dyson spoke to the Long Now Foundation this week in San Francisco about “The Digital Universe And Why Things Appear To Be Speeding Up”.

His first nugget was that at the dawn of the digital universe over 60 years ago it was all of 5 kilobytes in size. In todayspeak that’s about half a second of MP3 audio! It’s purpose was as far away from making music as you could imagine. It was set up to design hydrogen bombs.

Fast forward and as the digital footprint expanded exponentially, its acceleration became reflected in the self replication of computers: the pace today is 5-6 trillion connected resistors being added per second.

George used a brilliant analogy, that as a long time waterman resonates with me – as a kayak builder, he initially emulated the wood-scarce Arctic natives to work with minimum frame inside a skin craft. But (today, we are) in the tropics, where there is a surplus of wood, natives make dugout canoes, formed by removing wood.

According to George, “We’re now surrounded by so much information we have to become dugout canoe builders. The buzzword of last year was ‘big data.’

Stewart Brand, from the Long Now Foundation, defines the situation today as: Big data is what happened when the cost of storing information became less than the cost of throwing it away.

Have you started carving your canoe yet?

Incubate: Driving Campus-wide Entrepreneurship

I’ve been advising the Student Union at The University of Sydney on the setup of Incubate, a campus-wide startup development program. This initiative is designed to assist students get their ventures off the ground and will commence over the summer.

The launch event for Incubate is taking place at 5h30pm on the 20th September  in the foyer of the New Law Building on the Darlington campus. I’ll be chairing a panel on the innovation shift from Silicon Valley to other global centres. Panelists include Matt Barrie (Freelancer), Nikki Durkin (99dresses) and Matt Byrne (Curicon).

Come on over – it will be a fun event.

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Silicon Valley Is The Ultimate Entrepreneur Coach

In response to Jess Gardner’s article in last week’s BRW magazine, I was invited to pen a Letter to the Editor. It was published today. Here it is in its entirety:

Silicon Valley is the ultimate entrepreneur coach. It is synonymous with two core tenets for entrepreneurial success: focus and accountability. Palo Alto’s adrenalin-filled atmosphere focuses the minds of entrepreneurs.

For those who get funded, their investors hold them absolutely accountable.

Silicon Valley is also a state of mind. Being an entrepreneur there garners immediate respect.

Palo Alto was ground zero for the hippie movement and this points to its transformational role. It has reinvented itself a multitude of times as technology trends have shifted.

Within this transformational state of mind, Steve Jobs created the world’s most valuable company. Check in, and be an entrepreneur.

Not too long ago, Australia transformed itself into a sporting nation. From paddock to Olympic podium, we stand proud as a nation.

Jessica Gardner’s article points to a country ready for another change.

A generation aspires to be entrepreneurial but is also asking itself hard questions. The start-up scene in Australia is shifting but still resembles a cottage industry.

It’s time we focused again. It’s time to hold ourselves accountable and to transform into a nation of entrepreneurs. One focus, one nation, working together we can do it.

Check in, and be an Australian entrepreneur.

 

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Silicon Valley Beckons, But (Some) Aussies Prefer A Blended Approach

One of the most balanced articles I’ve read on the “should I stay, should I go – to Silicon Valley” debate was published today in Business Review Weekly.

Well done Jess Gardner – solid research.

This part of her article resonates most for me and it’s solid Cannon-Brookes advice:

Atlassian’s path shows it is possible to build a successful global operation from scratch in Australia but Cannon-Brookes says the company has also benefited from a blended approach. He has spent about two years in total, out of the past six, at Atlassian’s San Francisco digs (the company also has an office in The Netherlands and developers in Poland).

“I would definitely tell them [start-up founders] to spend time in the US,” he says. “It doesn’t need to be a pitchforks at 20 paces kind of a thing. We definitely gain as entrepreneurs, as a business, a tonne from having spent a lot of time there .?.?. I’ve learned a lot but that doesn’t mean that I don’t bring those learnings back and apply them down here and vice versa.”

Entrepreneurs: Be inspired, travel and do great things!

His point is that in the early stages, entrepreneurs shouldn’t regard the decision as a prerequisite step on the start-up path.

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Klout for Entrepreneurs: Creating a Global Entrepreneurial Standard

Have you noticed how entrepreneurs active in Silicon Valley seem to attract an extra level of cool factor simply by nature of the fact that they operate in that geography, while they same does not hold true elsewhere?

The issue is that so much in the entrepreneur space remains globally tethered to places like Silicon Valley, while there is an incredible entrepreneurial force happening around the world.

What we need is a Global Entrepreneurial Standard that recognises entrepreneurism wherever it happens and provides a common grounding and basis for discussion amongst entrepreneurs wherever they happen to be.

For example, if an entrepreneur from Cape Town flies to London, based on her measurement against the GES she would be able to meet with other business people, be they potential partners or investors and be taken seriously.

Think of the GES as similar to how Klout and Kred work in the social media arena. The GES would allow us to crystallise a Universal Power of Entrepreneurism and it would be really interesting to curate a range of case studies of entrepreneurs with a high UPE quotient.

As a starting point for discussion, in my experience as a serial entrepreneur, investor and executive coach I have found that entrepreneurs who score high against the following Triple A rating are able to attract funding, get stuff done, respond well to coaching and mentoring and build successful businesses. I call them Triple A Entrepreneurs:

Triple A Entrepreneurs can:

*Actualise goals

* Be held Accountable, and

* Achieve success

*

 

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Finding Positives In The Silicon Valley Brain Drain

I’ve had a number of people approach me in frustration at the recent article on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald highlighting how entrepreneurs are moving over to Silicon Valley in droves due to the lack of support they are getting in Australia.

It’s a serious situation and one I highlighted in my recent submission to the Federal Government. But I also want to paint a positive picture around the article in the SMH.

Here’s my take:

Back in the mid 2000s when I was the Director of Commercialisation at NICTA I was hell bent on leveraging their research as a platform to build a Nokia or SAP for Australia. We came close with Open Kernel Labs – their software is pervasively used on 1.6 billion mobile devices today and their journey is far from over. But, they are run by a US CEO and HQ’d in Chicago.

 

So for me, this is one of the major windmills I am tilting at. How do we build some major tech companies in Sydney that can boost the ecosystem around them and act as a “strange attractor” to bring smart entrepreneurs to our region as opposed to having them feel they need to move to Silicon Valley.

 

On the positive side, having more people like Nikki exposed to the Silicon Valley machine can mean that when she does return to Australia she will be far more globally connected and do the serial entrepreneur thing from here.



UPDATE: Nick Leeder, Google’s ANZ MD, echoes my sentiments in an article in the SMH, “Aussies are always going to travel, and that’s what makes this such a vibrant country. The trick is to get them back faster, and with their talented international mates in tow.”

The other positive thing to come from this article is the exposure to the problem in quarters that may not have had it within their current attention span. On the day the article was published I was having a conversation with a very senior bureaucrat in Canberra. She was excited that not only was this article published, but it was done on the front page of a major Australian newspaper. From her perspective it was good that because of this level of coverage these issues would reach the minds of this country’s senior politicians.

 

We need to keep pushing the barrow, encouraging more entrepreneurs to have a go and to think big, to think global, while living local.

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