Entrepreneur’s Rule Numero Uno: Value First

In a wide ranging interview with Kevin Rose, Silicon Valley venture guy Chris Sacca unveils how he became so well connected into the Valley’s machinery.

The video is an hour long, but it contains some real nuggets of entrepreneurial wisdom.

The part that resonates most for me is when he talks about creating value, before you ask for value back. That for me is the number one rule for entrepreneurs: VALUE FIRST!

Chris continues this meme, “If you are insightful and helpful, people will gravitate to you.”

 

 

Foundation 07 // Chris Sacca from Kevin Rose on Vimeo.

Novell Pulse: An Instantiation of Google Wave

Novell Pulse

Novell has begun marketing Pulse, an instantiation of Google Wave, with access to enterprise contacts and additional security. It should be available in Q1, ’10.

You can get more commentary over at ReadWriteEnterprise, and TheNextWeb.

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Open Mobile Markets: How To Drive Impetus

Open mobile platforms and markets are all the rage.

Apple generated $30m in the first month with its iStore, and has attracted a plethora of app developers of all shapes and sizes – from Electronic Arts through to start ups like Palo Alto-based Tapulous.

The first Android-powered GPhone is about to hit the streets and this means the Android market will be open for business. RIM is working on something similar and Microsoft is creating a platform for selling apps on its Windows Mobile systems called SkyMarket.

But take a closer look at the Android Market and one thing is glaringly obvious – it’s relatively deserted. Sure it’s a chicken and egg thing, but what made Facebook’s F8 platform so successful in gaining immediate impetus was the critical mass element.

Currently, only a handful of apps are ready for Android – MySpace has a basic version of its soc network ready, imeem’s Internet radio service and a number of weather related apps are the pick of the bunch.

Where is everybody? EA’s Spore, which is the best mobile game I’ve ever had the pleasure of playing would be a great marquee.

So here’s the rub. The beauty of the iPhone Store was that you could generate revenue immediately. The Android Market is currently missing that key revenue enabler – a closed commerce system.

As the number of app markets proliferates and the total addressable market mushrooms I suspect we’ll see a number of meta solutions appear. In particular meta systems that can market, track and monetize apps across all the platforms as well as tools that allow developers to code once, and release cross platform.

In the meantime, app store owners need to focus on getting traffic in the door, app developers buzzed about their platform and a monetization mechanism in place.

iPhone App Development Grows Up: Goldminers and Litigators Arrive

Last year the flavor was Facebook’s F8 Platform. This year it’s been all about iPhone apps. Fast followers, like Google, with Android, and RIM are emulating Apple’s app store, but the defining moment(s) that point to the platform having reached a stage of nascent maturity are twofold:

* firstly, the Sydney Morning Herald has cottoned on to the fact that there is good money to be made from developing apps – I’ll let you read the piece written by Asher Moses for yourselves, but I suspect/hope the developers will now descend on this new vein of “easy” moola;

* secondly, an iPhone developer has taken on Coors in a litigation over a beer drinking app emulation that users the iPhone’s tilt motion. Brave move, I wish Hottrix luck and hope their law firm is taking this on purely on contingency.

It will be great to see more developers tapping into these mobile app stores, but the key will be in keeping up the quality in the apps.

Google Chrome-Plates The Internet

The blogosphere is all abuzz over Google’s new browser – Chrome, which has been released today.

Usually I’m critical when a company launches a product for PC-only first, but in this case it plays to Google’s full frontal assault on Microsoft.

While you wait for the Mac version, check out this video about life at Google:

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Google Gets Customer Satisfaction, E-Business Benefits

Google’s customer satisfaction rating in 2008 has leapt 10% on the back of its transition from a search engine to a full service portal, according to a report from the University of Michigan.

The annual e-business report measures the ACSI (American Customer Satisfaction Index) and Google achieved 86 on the 100-point scale, one of the top ratings for any service company.

Not surprisingly, though, MSN and Yahoo lagged with an unchanged rating and a 3% fall respectively.

You can download the report here.

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